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Archive for October, 2017

17
Oct

Journalist’s Home Mini review unit was sending Google a recording of every sound it picked up

This journalist’s experience with a Google Home Mini is being called a glitch, or malfunction.

But let’s face it: these “smart home” devices are DESIGNED to perform 24/7 hour audio surveillance. And a user has no way of knowing when the device is “phoning home” without checking the logs. Anyone who installs one of these stupid things is signing up for the possibility of being surveilled, accidentally or intentionally by a hostile party, without knowing it.

The privacy glitch that befell Google’s new £49 ($49) Home Mini speaker last week was small but, critics might suggest, still revealing.

The trouble started when journalist Artem Russakovskii, who had been given a review unit at the launch event on 4 October, noticed that the Mini kept turning itself on even when not commanded to.

Deciding to search for clues in the device’s logs, he got a shock:

I opened it up, and my jaw dropped. I saw thousands of items, each with a Play button and a timestamp.

The Mini, it seemed had recorded and uploaded to Google every sound detected in its vicinity for a two-day period, which seemed to be every sound no matter how inconsequential. It even activated after a simple knock on the wall.

This behaviour could be disabled and recordings deleted but only at the expense of harming the system’s future voice recognition accuracy.

If you value your privacy, don’t install a so-called smart speaker in your home, whether made by Google, Amazon, Apple, or any other company. It’s not worth it. The fact that microphones and cameras are standard in laptops, tablets, and smartphones and can be remotely hijacked is problematic enough.

4
Oct

Big Brother Google unveils Clips, a $249 semi-autonomous recording device

Yikes:

Google has just announced Google Clips, a new hands-free camera that takes photos for you. Instead of having to pull yourself out of special moments to shoot photos and videos, Clips will capture moments so you can be in them.

Software is at the core of the camera, meaning Clips can be made smarter and more powerful over time as Google continues to push out new updates.

Clips can capture a 130-degree field of view at 15 frames per second. Each motion photo moment captured by Clips lasts several seconds and is called a “clip,” and they can be browsed using your Pixel phone. No audio is recorded. Each clip can be saved as motion photo, or you can select a single frame from the motion to save as an auto-enhanced, high-resolution photo.

On the front of Clips is a button for capturing photos manually. With a tiny form factor, Clips is designed to be clipped to “almost anything” or set down to document things remotely.

Clips has facial learning features — the more it sees a person, the more it learns to capture more clips of that individual. It also learns to recognize pets like cats and dogs.

Google engineers have laughably attempted to address the privacy implications of their Orwellian creation by giving it an offline mode. In other words, they’re telling potential buyers you don’t need to connect it to the Internet to use it. But of course, you’ll be encouraged to do so — the device has been designed for semi-autonomous recording and the presumption is people will want to share moments they’ve recorded.

There’s also an indicator light — which is a standard feature of webcams.

Commenters at PetaPixel are rightly skeptical. Writes one:

This is not about memories. How many people actually have time to go back and relive the unbelievable amount of memories that would build up? This is about Google’s AI learning and growing. This is about amassing algorithms to make their AI smarter. Simply put, this is getting scary. A record of intimate moments kept on Google servers. But like you, I guess I have already given up freedoms because of my Google phones and tablets. What have I done?

Says another:

As if Google didn’t know enough of our lives yet….

And another:

I don’t like it… We’re getting into some real Orwellian #$%& here. Always listening microphones, bed facing cameras and 24/7 recording body cams… I don’t want any of this stuff, having a phone is bad enough.

Save your $250 and pass on Google Clips, another unnecessary invention the world doesn’t need.

3
Oct

Naked Security breaks down the Google tracking feature you didn’t know you’d switched on

This is a must-read:

Using GPS, Wi-Fi and cell tower data, Google’s Your Timeline can paint a very accurate picture of your daily life. If you’ve got it switched on, it stores every step you take and everywhere you go.

And the thing is, lots of people seem to have it switched on without even realising, including me, and my favourite hats come in tinfoil.

I was surprised it had slipped past me so I started asking other people if they had it switched on too. More often than not, without making a conscious decision to let Google follow them around, they had.

In the end I decided to ask 20 people at random and write down the answers. The result of my short, non-scientific survey? 95% of the people I asked – a mixture of people in technical and non-technical roles – had location history, or its slightly less obnoxious iPhone equivalent Frequent Locations, turned on, tracking their every step, without realising.

Check for yourself. On Android it’s under Settings > Location > Google Location History.

So what exactly is Google Timeline? Google says: “Your timeline in Google Maps helps you find the places you’ve been and the routes you’ve travelled. Your timeline is private, so only you can see it.”

Only you. And Google.

Read the whole thing. The WHOLE THING.

This could be the best post Naked Security has ever published.

Well done, Sophos, and thanks for helping more people understand how to liberate themselves from having their every move tracked by the Monster of Mountain View.